Morgan Freeman embarked on a journey as The Story of God premiered on NatGeo

storyofgod.nationalgeographic.com

The Story of God with Morgan Freeman premiered last Sunday on National Geographic, and is set to air all 5 episodes in Spanish on Nat Geo Mundo, and  globally on National Geographic Channels in 171 countries, and translated or dubbed to  45 languages.

As the executive producer, Morgan Freeman doesn’t narrate someone else’s story, but he takes a journey every viewer gets to witness. As he asks very profound questions, he travels to the epicenters of each religion, belief, or school of thought, and learns from experts, priests, archaeologists, rabbis, and other religious authorities what their religion’s take on the question is.

Take for example last Sunday’s question, what happens after we die? He explores resurrection in the Christian faith and from the Jewish perspective, reincarnation from the Hindu, and even explores science and its takes on how to cheat death.

What’s interesting isn’t just the journey he’s on, which is quite amazing. To break the limitations on one faith and go around to find each religion’s view on the question makes the journey personable, it makes it vulnerable, even real. We’ve all asked those questions and for many of us one answer has sufficed. For others the question is more important than the faith itself, so the quest for the answer becomes almost like a personal religion. Here you have none. It is an almost child-like curiosity to find common ground and open up to conversation about these questions between people of all walks of life.

Also Read: “Killing Jesus” movie airs on National Geographic

I’m also impacted by the scenery, the places he visits. These are very important historical places. They are of great significance, way beyond their religious implications. I for one know that many of them are on my bucket list of places to visit. Others I didn’t even know existed! I mean the history lessons! I’m about to bust out with a notebook and pen, and just take notes. Don’t be surprised if you feel the same!

Here’s the thing, as a Christian I realize that as open-minded as I believe to be, there’s still so much to learn. We cannot be afraid of what’s outside of our bubble. In the end is not what you’re exposed to but what you allow to have an effect on you that really matters. This show isn’t going to change my faith. My faith comes from what God has done for me! PERSONALLY. There’s no point in believing in any god if that god cannot personally impact your life, for good. If he cannot change you, he’s of no value, to me.

Related: 20 Questions with Morgan Freeman | The Story of God

I’m fascinated by these shows because of all the information I get to consume. I’d rather be watching this than all the different Real Housewives (which I’m addicted to, pray for me), and all the other reality TV shows out there (except my pastors Rich Wilkerson Jr. and Dawn Cheré, Rich in Faith on Oxygen, that I’ll keep watching over and over). But they don’t get to change my faith nor make me question my God. He’s real to me today and every day, because of what happens when I have a relationship with Him.

So don’t be afraid. Watch it and educate yourself on what others believe. I think there’s something so loving about going the extra mile to understand others in order to have intelligent and gentle conversations. If we cared about what the other believes, maybe we could have a real positive impact in this world. We know we need it and BAD.

This is a 5-episode series, each centered on specific themes: Afterlife, End of Days, Creation, Who is God?, Evil, and Miracles. These are the questions Morgan Freeman travels with and tries to find the answer to in different beliefs.

The Story of God with Morgan Freeman is produced by Revelations Entertainment for National Geographic Channel. For Revelations Entertainment, Morgan Freeman, Lori McCreary and James Younger are executive producers.

 

“Killing Jesus” movie airs on National Geographic

We know Jesus was hated and not liked by some, worshipped and followed by others. But do we really know the thoughts inside the minds of the men responsible for his life ending on a cross?

These and more are some of the questions that the film adaptation of “Killing Jesus” attempts to answer.

The series will air tonight on National Geographic at 8/7c and is the third of the “Killing” book series written by Bill O’Rilley and Martin Dugand. The earlier books in the series are “Killing Kennedy” and “Killing Lincoln”.

Jesus with his disciples / National Geographic
Jesus with his disciples / National Geographic

 

Christopher Menaul wanted to direct the movie in such a way that it would appeal believers and non believers. And it did, in more ways than one.

The idea behind the book and film are to present the environment politically and socially around and during the time of Jesus. Today there are more than 2.2 billion Christians around the world, but what did it look like when He was walking here on Earth and who felt threatened by his presence?

Now for those Christians who have experienced an Easter or two within a Christian church, this may seem repetitive. But even in the movie “Passion of the Christ”, the environment outside of Jesus’ circle wasn’t widely presented.

The movie captures the ideology and beliefs of the high priests and governors, and of the people around Jesus, including family. It’s surprising to see a more in-depth look into people who to us Christians don’t seem as important, but were key in his life and death.

Caiaphas
Caiaphas with the temple guards

Unfortunately the biblical counts are weak and sometimes even wrong, according to what we’re used to seeing and hearing, and honestly what we’ve made up in our minds happened during the time of our Savior. But there’s something to be said about the humanity of Jesus, who walked wanting to spread a simple message of love and had to adapt as people responded to his journey and his message.

Haaz Sleiman, the actor playing Jesus, is actually muslim and may be the first Middle Eastern to portray Jesus, which makes for an interesting twist but also win, since so much criticism arises with each actor that portrays Jesus in different movies and series.

“I was familiar with Jesus’ story from a very young age. It’s probably the most famous story of all time, one that touched me and inspired me as a child,” said the actor when asked how he prepared for the role.

The movie was produced by Mark Huffman and Aidan Elliot, and includes names like Kelsey Grammer, John Rhys-Davies and Eion Macken as part of the cast.

Grammer, a Christian, speaks of his faith and the more spiritual experience of the film:

“It sure does require a lot of faith. I’m a Christian. I think Jesus is the most remarkable human being that’s ever lived. I love the saying in the Bible, “He was made a little less than the angels, to become so much more.” The lessons he taught and the examples he gave resonate to this day. I’ve seen half of the producers on this set start to cry — when they talk about how “we’re going to shoot this scene today or that scene,” and then they well up a little bit. It’s a remarkable thing and I think that’s a great service to what is good about religion.”

This is a movie that MUST be watched. Whether you’re Christian or not, whether you agree with the movie completely or find the missing pieces, it’ll definitely open up your mind o a new perspective, it’ll place Jesus’ story in a culture, society, and political environment that many haven’t cared to see but should thoroughly comprehend.

If it doesn’t do any of the above, it’ll at least show you what others are learning, seeing, and maybe believing.

Tune in, watch, enjoy, and learn.